February, 2008

NGOs are failing to lead the environmental movement. Labour must step into the breach

  |  29 February 2008

The part biofueled Virgin flight from London recently was a headline writer's gift if ever there was one. I suppose if Virgin wanted to be taken seriously, though, they would have powered the flight using anything other than coconuts.

But it wasn't the reaction of the press that bothered me - I'd have been more shocked had they not turned a cynical spin on a tycoon's green aviation claims. No, what really got up my nose was the reaction of the environmental lobby.

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Labour in the south: The view from Southampton

Alan Whitehead MP  |  29 February 2008

The last in our series about Labour in the south

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NGOs are failing to lead the environmental movement. Labour must step into the breach

  |  29 February 2008

The part biofueled Virgin flight from London recently was a headline writer's gift if ever there was one. I suppose if Virgin wanted to be taken seriously, though, they would have powered the flight using anything other than coconuts.

But it wasn't the reaction of the press that bothered me - I'd have been more shocked had they not turned a cynical spin on a tycoon's green aviation claims. No, what really got up my nose was the reaction of the environmental lobby.

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Labour in the south: The view from Dartford

Howard Stoate MP  |  28 February 2008

Dartford has done well under Labour. More and more businesses are moving to the area; unemployment is a fraction of what it was a generation ago and the new Ebbsfleet International Station and Bluewater Shopping Centre have helped to transform perceptions of the area. It is no longer an economic backwater struggling to come to …

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Respect cuts both ways

Phil Taylor  |  27 February 2008

Two issues in the past few days suggest that there is a serious job to do to change the national dialogue about young people. And as a party and government we are ideally placed to take the lead.

The row over the Mosquito, the device that emits a high-pitched sound to disperse groups of teenagers, is perhaps the most depressing. Is there any other section of society where it would be acceptable to force them to move on by assaulting them in this way? There are estimated to be 3,500 of these devices in public spaces that should be for everyone. They don't target law-breaking or anti-social behaviour but every young person indiscriminately. Is that the best we can do to engage with young people?

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Labour in the south: The view from Battersea

Martin Linton  |  27 February 2008

I couldn’t believe it when we won Hastings & Rye in 1997. ‘Hastings? Hastings?’ I kept saying to myself. ‘And Rye? It’s full of tea shops, isn’t it?’ Well, they must have been Labour-voting tea-shops, because we still hold it, 11 years later. Must be the MP. However, it’s not going to be easy to …

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Labour in the south: The view from Crawley

Laura Moffatt  |  27 February 2008

As the Labour MP with the smallest majority in the country – just 37 votes – there cannot be anyone with a greater vested interest in having a south-east focus than me. But the truth is that what happens in the south-east matter to us all. Why? Well if Labour loose more than 25 seats …

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Mark McDonald

Mark McDonald  |  26 February 2008

Why I'm standing to be treasurer of the Labour party

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A bill of rights could work. Just not Cameron’s insular, populist version

Kevin Bonavia  |  26 February 2008

A few days after the Court of Appeal ruled that Lotfi Raissi, a pilot wrongly accused of training 9/11 hijackers, could sue for compensation, I was told by a Southend resident that this was an example of how we were all a lot less safer because of the Human Rights Act: ‘Who is it this law is trying to protect, is it the criminals or the rest of us?' We briefly discussed Raissi, how he had nothing to do with 9/11, but was jailed, condemned as a terrorist and could never again fly as a pilot. He was at the wrong place at the wrong time. If the Human Rights Act had eventually saved him, it could be a safeguard for all of us. But convincing people that the Human Rights Act is about all our rights as opposed to the criminal rights charter that the tabloids would have you believe isn't exactly easy. The person I had spoken to agreed that the Human Rights Act might have been a good thing in Mr Raissi's case, but I couldn't say that she would agree with me that it is one of our most necessary laws for protecting our way of life.

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Why he can win

Duncan O'Leary  |  25 February 2008

Obama has shown himself to be not just inspiring but brave and resilient

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