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After Saturday’s success, here’s what you can do right now

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Saturday’s march for a People’s Vote was one of the biggest in British history. Big protests alone do not achieve change, but they can be vital in working towards it – if the right approach is taken once the march is over. Getting hundreds of thousands of people in one place is impressive enough, but turning that into a movement is even harder.

So we need to make sure actions are taken; that politicians know that Saturday was not a one-off. Theresa May claims that Brexit is 95 per cent done. Regardless of the truth of that (and I am sceptical), it is clearly now time to increase the political pressure. Below, you can find two things that you can do right now to help the public get a say on the Brexit deal.

-Conor Pope, deputy editor


Take action

This Saturday LabourSay activists brushed off their hangovers, rolled out of bed and hit the streets to join the Labour bloc at the People’s Vote march. We were joined by around 700,000 activists from across the country to make it clear to Theresa May that we want our voices heard.

But marches aren’t just about getting some Vitamin D and making funny placards: now it’s time to take action. There are two things you can do to channel the optimism of Saturday’s march into real change. One, you can write to your MP to let them know you’re expecting them to vote to give us a say on the final deal. Two, you can donate to LabourSay to help us keep up the momentum.

We convinced Labour conference, we turned out Labour members to the biggest demonstration in 14 years: now we take the fight to parliament.

Donate to LabourSay.

 


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Five things to read today

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Conor Pope

is deputy editor at Progress

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