October 2015



Editorial Into the unknown It is a Next Left project on New Labour’s scale, not its blueprint, that must be built

Opinion Modernising modernisers Richard Angell’s new motto is, ‘If it is not hurting, it is not working’

The Insider Another dispatch from inside the Westminster village

Opinion – A question of liberty The trade union bill must be defeated, says Frances O’Grady

The Debate Could ‘PQE’ work? Richard Murphy and John Mann debate ‘people’s quantitative easing’

Opinion – Europe for patriots Labour’s case can be progressive and patriotic, believes Emma Reynolds

Opinion – No fear Catherine Stihler argues a public figure should lead the ‘In’ campaign

Opinion – Positive and profound The ‘In’ campaign needs to start big, demands Josh MacAlister

Opinion – A fight on our hands The time for complacency is over, warns Roger Liddle

Opinion The king is dead, long live the king Australia has a new prime minister, again, reports Sam Dastyari

Opinion – Knife-edge Felicity Slater finds the success of centre-left reformers hangs in the balance

Letter from … Hugo Coelho on the fate of Portugal’s Socialist party in this month’s general election

The Progressive The price of a seat in parliament Mandatory reselection could reduce Labour MPs to the status of delegates

Opinion Staying power Olivia Bailey examines the lessons to learn from Fightback!

Opinion Militant’s modus operandi Keep ‘cybernat’ politics at bay, recommends Richard Angell

Opinion One hundred per cent of nothing Paul Farrelly on what Hammer of the Left can tell us now

Commentary Argue your case Labour’s moderate tradition defends constant values, not outdated policies, argues Paul Richards

Tanked Up Adam Harrison with the latest from the wonk world


Right first time Stuart Hudson presents five steps to regaining Labour’s economic credibility

The gilded cage Labour can no longer let its intellectual conservatism hold it back, writes David Butler

Labour’s austerity bind Labour allowed everyone to give its spending plans
whatever name they liked, writes Hopi Sen

Power of speech Thirty years after Neil Kinnock’s Bournemouth speech, Robert Philpot recalls the fight to save the Labour party from the hard left

The dog that didn’t bark Has the public changed its mind about immigration? Sunder Katwala investigates


How to Be a Parliamentary Researcher Robert Dale sheds light on the contribution of the humble bag-carrier in the nation’s democracy, finds Sadie Smith

What Would Keir Hardie Say? Pauline Bryan’s fascinating collection of essays is a timely reminder of Keir Hardie’s sheer achievement of founding the Labour party, says Greg Rosen

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