Magazines

January/February 2003

January/February 2003

Upfront

Comment

News

Westminster watch

Inside Parliament

Opinion

Firms but fair A democratic economy is need to deliver social justice, says Patricia Hewitt

Investing in the future Gordon Brown on the Pre-Budget Report

Delivering in the wards Can foundation hospitals renew public services, asks Paul Thompson

Pay back time Fund higher education by a graduate tax, says Tom Watson

Rough justice The criminal justice system fails women, suggests Vera Baird

Gutter sniping Barbara Follett on the press and Cherie Blair

Make it personal We must speak to voters as individuals, believes David Triesman

Letters

Cover – The Next Politics

Choice of a new generation What will the electorate of the future look like, asks Greg Cook

To boldly grow Matthew Taylor and Matt Cain chart the way ahead for political parties

Yellow fever Can the Lib Dems replace the Tories, wonders Paul Whiteley

Apathy in the UK John Curtice examines whether voter turnout will continue to fall

Change for the better Labour must continually renew itself, believes Peter Mandelson

Features

A greener world Michael Meacher reports on the way ahead after the Earth Summit

Give peace a chance A visit to Iraq changed Johann Hari’s mind

Whingers on the fringes James Corbett investigates the record of the Green Party

My Major moment of 2002 Progress asks leading Labour figures to pick their moment of the year

Regulars

International Fight club Where will the Democrats go after their election defeat, asks Robert Philpot

Inside Labour Mutual respect The Co-op Party’s ideals are increasingly relevant, says Oliver Fry

Pilgrim Mission improbable Why do British political drams not tell the truth about politics – that it’s all about hope?

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