Ed Balls

The Last Word: May is promising what she cannot deliver

Richard Angell  |  12 May 2017

Immigration pledges, manifesto matters and and Momentum’s marginals – Richard Angell has the last word on the week’s news Drop the migration pledge David Cameron is known for throwing red meat to his backbenchers. Time and again he put party management before the country. The referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union being the …

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A sober statement for sober times

Allen Simpson  |  23 November 2016

There is a well trodden formula to government finance announcements. The chancellor rumbles on about why the economy is heading in the right direction under his watch but doom would surely result if the feckless opposition were in charge. Then after the cleansing sorbet of one of those jokes only politicians find funny, they say …

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Speaking Out: Lessons in Life and Politics

Roger Liddle  |  10 November 2016

Ed Balls’ Speaking Out will be regarded as one of best written and readable political autobiographies of his generation. It is not in the class of Denis Healey’s The Time of My Life, though there are some interesting parallels between Balls and Healey – serious intellectuals with brilliant minds, both bruisers in build and temperament, …

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A welcome focus on winning

Nick Bent  |  26 January 2016

Sharply contrasted against the unedifying and introspective nature of certain elements of the current Labour party, the great strength of the Beckett report is that it is firmly focused on the public and on the future. Specifically, it is a useful blueprint to the massive challenge of how Labour wins the 2020 general election. So …

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What Would Keir Hardie Say?

Greg Rosen  |  9 October 2015

This fascinating collection of essays is a timely reminder of Keir Hardie’s sheer achievement of founding the Labour party and the doggedness and courage it took. Essays emphasise his moral voice, the depth of his determination to overcome adversity, his Christian faith, and his socialism. Hardie was ‘a socialist not a statist,’ writes Melissa Benn. …

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Labour’s austerity bind

Hopi Sen  |  24 September 2015

Labour allowed everyone to give its spending plans whatever name they liked, writes Hopi Sen On 2 November 1948, Hansard records that Michael Foot told the House of Commons, ‘I have not seen much of this eager enthusiasm among members of the Conservative party to support the austerity drive of the chancellor of the exchequer’. If …

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Be yourself, Ed

Matt Forde  |  19 March 2015

This is no time for mankini politics, warns Matt Forde There’s a lot of rubbish written about Ed Miliband having an image problem. Of course he’s got one, but it’s not the fundamental problem. He won’t change his image and neither should he. I hope he doesn’t anyway, because, as an impressionist, he’s an absolute …

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After the autumn statement: What now for the two main parties?

Rich Durber  |  4 December 2014

Both George Osborne and Ed Balls are likely to be satisfied with their performances during the autumn statement yesterday, in what most objective people will see as a score-draw. The chancellor failed to deliver the knockout blow to the opposition that some in Labour’s ranks had feared he might, but neither was he forced into …

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Closing Labour’s deficit

Jonathan Todd  |  6 November 2014

The Conservatives may not have won the last general election but Labour lost it. Labour was thought too keen on spending other people’s money, particularly in areas where the public are least keen to see their money spent, such as working-age welfare. As the Labour leadership candidates were reaching for the party’s erogenous zones, which …

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‘I’m jarring with my colleagues’

Adam Harrison and Robert Philpot  |  1 September 2014

There will be no big spending under Labour, Chris Leslie tells Robert Philpot and Adam Harrison Chris Leslie is an improbable hate figure. With his affable manner and gentle northern accent, he is not obviously one of politics’ bruisers. Yet in June the Observer’s political columnist, Andrew Rawnsley, predicted that if Labour forms the next …

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