Gordon Brown

A Woman’s Work

Niamh Ni Mhaoileoin  |  2 February 2017

Harriet Harman’s book is an exhaustive account of the women’s movement in parliament since 1982, writes Niamh Ní Mhaoileoin When Harriet Harman caused controversy by bringing her baby to a parliamentary vote soon after being elected, she received a call from the serjeant-at-arms. ‘Only members are allowed in the division lobby,’ he explained. ‘And babies are not members.’ …

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Hammond must face the future

Richard Angell  |  22 November 2016

Tomorrow is the autumn statement. It is the first economic intervention by the new chancellor since Britain’s decision to leave the European Union. But this is not the statement of a new government. This is the sixth year of this Tory government. What is unclear is if it is George Osborne’s apprentice or outrider that will …

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The constitutional talking shop

John McTernan  |  10 November 2016

What is it about Labour and the constitution?  After a series of electoral setbacks, there always comes the demand for constitutional reforms. The Labour party has suffered shattering defeats over the last six years – two general elections, two Scottish elections, the Brexit referendum and, most damaging of all, two elections of Jeremy Corbyn as leader. …

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Speaking Out: Lessons in Life and Politics

Roger Liddle  |  10 November 2016

Ed Balls’ Speaking Out will be regarded as one of best written and readable political autobiographies of his generation. It is not in the class of Denis Healey’s The Time of My Life, though there are some interesting parallels between Balls and Healey – serious intellectuals with brilliant minds, both bruisers in build and temperament, …

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A constitutional convention for all

George Foulkes  |  7 November 2016

For some years now support for a United Kingdom constitutional convention to deal with the English democratic deficit, reform of the House of Lords and to move toward a more federal UK has been gathering momentum. Jeremy Purvis and I set up an all-party group at Westminster with the support of the English Local Government …

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Don’t accept this new, ‘new normal’

Adam Harrison  |  26 October 2016

Labour’s six-year slide damages not just the party but the country My first day working at Progress, Monday 4 January 2010, saw us catapulted into the general election campaign. Wasting no time in the early new year, David Cameron displayed his will to win by releasing the first part of the Conservative manifesto, which was …

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No compromise with reality? 

Richard Angell  |  19 September 2016

No one has levelled with the public about what drives migration to this country ‘No compromise with the electorate’ was Ted Knight’s infamous opinion when he and his hard-left friends ran Lambeth council into the ground in the 1980s. After the 2015 general election, a senior Labour member of parliament who has long been associated with …

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The centre-left must own the future or become a thing of the past

Sam Stopp  |  2 September 2016

During his ill-starred attempt to become Labour leader in 2010, David Miliband fired several warning shots to Labour’s centre-left about the danger it was in. ‘Future’, he said somewhat whimsically, ‘is the most important word in politics. We must convince our fellow citizens that we are a party of the future.’ Few could have imagined …

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‘It’s moved from comedy to tragedy’

Richard Angell  |  30 August 2016

The Labour party still has a long road to walk on women’s equality, Ayesha Hazarika tells Richard Angell Having rushed across town, comic-turned-political-adviser (turned comic again) Ayesha Hazarika arrives at King’s Cross station to find her train to Edinburgh, where her first major show since leaving politics is on at the comedy fringe, has been …

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Labour’s progressive battle

Mike Ion  |  18 February 2016

The Labour government ‘contributed almost nothing new or imaginative to the pool of ideas with which men seek to illuminate human nature and its environment’. So wrote the New Statesman in a 1954 biographical piece about Clement Attlee and the 1945-1951 Labour government. Amazing as though it may now appear, some contemporary Labour figures of …

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