welfare

Social security in disrepair

Sheila Gilmore  |  24 October 2017

Labour will have to do more than just win the ‘moral argument’ on universal credit if it is to protect the most vulnerable in society, writes Sheila Gilmore In all the current media coverage of universal credit there is a danger that we lose sight of the fact that it is only (as yet) a …

1 Comment Read more

Corbyn’s social security silence

Alan Lockey  |  29 September 2017

The Labour leader’s deliberate vagueness on social security is a betrayal of those that elected him hoping he would rebuild Britain’s broken welfare state, argues Alan Lockey Perhaps it was inevitable anyway. Nevertheless, the significance of the 2015 welfare reform bill to Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour leadership ascent is surely indisputable. As his three leadership rivals demurred, only …

0 Comments Read more

Irrelevance has a human cost

Sheila Gilmore  |  28 March 2017

Only by convincing the electorate that Labour is a credible alternative government can we tackle the inequities of Britain’s social security system, argues Progress strategy board member Sheila Gilmore I have a confession to make. I have not seen ‘ I, Daniel Blake’. I am sure it is a powerful film, but I do not need to be convinced. …

0 Comments Read more

Budget 2017: 20 Tory failures

Alison McGovern MP  |  8 March 2017

From abandoning their deficit targets to slashing funding for education, it is clear the Tories are failing on their own terms, argues Progress chair Alison McGovern MP Debt The Tories have delayed their target on debt three times since 2010 Background: Their original target (2011) was to have debt falling by 2015-16. Then in 2014 that was …

3 Comments Read more

Universal credit in disarray

Margaret Greenwood MP  |  15 February 2017

The government’s universal credit policy has proved to be neither fair nor simple, argues shadow minister for employment and inequalities Margaret Greenwood MP In 2010, Iain Duncan-Smith proclaimed that universal credit would restore ‘fairness and simplicity’ to the social security system by replacing a range of in-work benefits with a single payment. The aim was to …

1 Comment Read more

Holding the powerful to account

Karen Buck MP  |  11 November 2016

This summer, the joint work and pensions/business, innovation and skills parliamentary select committee inquiry into the collapse of British Home Stores and its pension scheme concluded with one of the most devastating reports to come out of the select committee process. The report described  the ‘systematic plunder of BHS at the cost of the 11,000 jobs and …

3 Comments Read more

Practical compassion

Sheila Gilmore  |  28 October 2016

On ‘welfare ‘ Labour is struggling to find the right policy and language. In the last parliament we spent a lot of time attacking the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government’s policies, through debates on the welfare reform bill, opposition led debates, and at prime minister’s questions. There was no lack of anger and passion. The Tories …

1 Comment Read more

Solving Britain’s early years crisis

James Metcalfe  |  4 August 2016

In 1999, Labour pledged to eradicate child poverty by declaring that ‘no child be left behind’. Whilst in government, it was Labour’s determination to tackle inequality and promote social mobility that saw the creation of Sure Start and the establishment of a National Minimum Wage. But whilst Labour made huge strides to create equality of …

0 Comments Read more

Social Policy in a Cold Climate: Policies And Their Consequences Since The Crisis

Carys Roberts  |  20 June 2016

Too often, the actual effects of past policy decisions are not fully evaluated or even remembered in the public discourse, though doing so would tell us a lot about the wisdom of current decisions. Social Policy in a Cold Climate, the result of a mammoth research programme by the London School of Economics’ Centre for …

0 Comments Read more

A basic income would hurt, not help

Glen Mitchell  |  13 June 2016

The idea of a universal basic income is not without merit and Christabel Edwards argues the case well as do others most notably the RSA who have been strongly advocating for the concept over last year. However, I would argue that three key questions need to be answered before Labour commits to taking such a …

1 Comment Read more